Tag Archives: Dr S.S. Gill

Eye Health – Glaucoma (Final Part)

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Dr S S Gill, Consultant Ophthalmologist, Hospital Fatimah Ipoh
Dr S S Gill, Consultant Ophthalmologist

In conjunction with World Glaucoma  Awareness, Ipoh Echo talks to Consultant Eye Surgeon Dr. S.S. Gill about this “silent thief of sight” – Final Part.

Glaucoma as you know has been nicknamed the “silent thief of sight”. This disease results in permanent irreversible blindness in the affected eye(s) that often goes without symptoms until the loss of vision is significant or the patient is blind. Early diagnosis means early treatment and therefore prevention of major loss of vision.

Glaucoma treatment may either involve eye drops instillation, pills, laser surgery, conventional surgery or a combination of these methods. The ultimate goal of treatment is to prevent optic nerve damage that results in irreversible loss of vision. Taking medications regularly as prescribed, is crucial to prevent vision-threatening nerve damage.

1. Eyedrops

The first line of treatment is often instillation of special eye drops that can reduce eye pressure. These will have to be instilled daily without fail in order to prevent loss of vision. Sometimes doctors will prescribe a combination of eye drops in order to lower the eye pressure adequately. There are many patients on eyedrops for years who have their vision preserved. Always be diligent with the instillation of any eyedrops that have been prescribed for glaucoma.

ipoh echo issue 143,  Dr. S.S. Gill, glaucoma, ipoh opthalmologist2. Oral Medication

Oral medication usually has quite a few side effects that may include skin rash, tingling in the hands or feet, nausea or upset stomach, kidney stone formation, altered taste (especially with carbonated beverages), weight loss, fatigue, and decreased energy. So, they are generally not used long term. They are generally only used to treat acute eye pressure increase.

ipoh echo issue 143, Dr. S.S. Gill, glaucoma, ipoh opthalmologist3. Laser Surgery

Depending on the condition of your eyes, laser treatment may be recommended if suitable. Laser surgery is performed on an outpatient basis in an eye doctor’s office or clinic after the eye has been numbed. A laser is directed toward the trabecular meshwork which is the area that drains the fluid (aqueous humor) from the eye into the blood. There are many kinds of laser surgery and they are usually recommended based on the type of glaucoma.

ipoh echo issue 143, Dr. S.S. Gill, glaucoma, ipoh opthalmologist4. Surgery

Surgery is usually recommended if the eye pressure cannot be controlled by all of the above treatments. Surgery involves creating means for the eye fluid (aqueous humor) to drain in order to relieve the eye pressure.

As a last resort, a special glaucoma drainage device may have to be implanted in the eye in order to relieve the eye pressure.

In summary, get an eye examination done annually. If you are diagnosed with glaucoma, it does not mean you will go blind. It only means that you will need to be treated intensively in order to prevent you from going blind.

For more information, contact Gill Eye Specialist Centre at  05-5455582, email: gilleyecentre@dr.com or visit www.fatimah.com.my.

Eye Health – Glaucoma (Part 6)

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Dr S S Gill, Consultant Ophthalmologist, Hospital Fatimah Ipoh
Dr S S Gill, Consultant Ophthalmologist

In conjunction with World Glaucoma Awareness Week, Ipoh Echo talks to Consultant Eye Surgeon Dr S.S. Gill about this “silent thief of sight” – PART 6

Glaucoma as you know has been nicknamed the “silent thief of sight”. This disease results in permanent irreversible blindness in the affected eye(s) that often goes without symptoms until the loss of vision is significant or the patient is blind. Early diagnosis means early treatment and therefore prevention of major loss of vision. Diagnosing glaucoma may require elaborate testing to be done by the eye doctor.

The following are basically the tests that are done before making a diagnosis of glaucoma:

Examination of:                                                                     Name of  Eye Test:
Eye Pressure                                                                           Tonometry
Angle of the eye where the aqueous (eye fluid) drains                  Gonioscopy
Optic Nerve check                                                                    Ophthalmoscopy (dilated eye exam)
Field of Vision                                                                          Perimetry
Thickness of the Optic Nerve Fibre Layer                                    Ocular Coherence Tomography Scan

Test numbers 1, 2, and 3 were already discussed in the previous issue (141) of the Ipoh Echo.

4. Visual Fields

Visual field test (perimetry)

Glaucoma-Visual Field Testing (Perimetry) - Dr S.S. GillA visual field test (perimetry) checks for the “missing areas” of vision. This is done using a machine called Perimeter (photo on the left)

You will be shown a sequence of lights that appear in the periphery of a dome. Should you be able to see the lights appearing on and off within the dome of the machine, you will then be asked to click on a button.

If you cannot see the spots in your peripheral vision, it may indicate that the glaucoma has damaged your vision.

5. Ocular Coherence Tomography (O.C.T.) Scan

Glaucoma-Visual Field Testing (Perimetry) - Dr S.S. GillThe O.C.T. Scan is a newer and accurate way of determining whether or not a person has glaucoma. In glaucoma the retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) gets thinned-out resulting in loss of vision peripherally (tunnel-vision).

The O.C.T. Scan is able to measure this thickness of the retinal nerve fibre layer (that gets thinned out in glaucoma) thereby accurately confirming diagnosis.

In a confirmed glaucoma patient, by serially checking the RNFL, it can detect whether the glaucoma is worsening or not. This test has made glaucoma evaluation much simpler and more reliable. The downside is that the test may not be available in every eye clinic.

For more information, contact Gill Eye Specialist Centre at  05-5455582, email: gilleyecentre@dr.com or visit: www.fatimah.com.my.

Eye Health – Glaucoma

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Dr S S Gill, Consultant Ophthalmologist, Hospital Fatimah Ipoh
Dr S S Gill, Consultant Ophthalmologist

In conjunction with World Glaucoma Week 2012, Ipoh Echo talks to Consultant Eye Surgeon Dr S.S. Gill about this “silent thief of sight ”  – PART 4

Glaucoma as you know has been nicknamed the “silent thief of sight”. This disease results in permanent irreversible blindness in the affected eye(s) that often goes unnoticed until the loss of vision is significant.

What Is Unnoticed Loss Of Vision?

In some types of glaucoma such as Primary Open Angle Glaucoma and Normal Tension Glaucoma, the visual loss occurs very slowly without the patient ever noticing until the disease is in its advanced stage. You may wonder how a person can be losing vision without noticing it. Well, this is because the visual loss is from the periphery.

This peripheral visual loss is typically described as tunnel vision. Starting in the peripheral most part of the field of vision, the visual loss slowly starts encroaching into the central vision. This slowly progressing loss of vision is often unnoticed by the patient until a substantial amount of peripheral vision has been lost. Furthermore, glaucoma is “silent” without any acute pain or symptoms.

Early Glaucoma

Early glaucoma tunnel vision - Eye Health - Dr S.S. GillThis picture simulates the early tunnel vision that a glaucoma patient may have and yet may not notice that there is peripheral loss of vision. A major part of the central vision is good and the patient is still able to see well. This peripheral loss of vision can only be detected by specialised testing called Perimetry or Visual Field Testing.

Advanced Glaucoma

Advanced glaucoma tunnel vision - Eye Health - Dr S.S. GillThis picture shows advanced glaucoma. Most of the peripheral vision has been lost here. Only a small tunnel of vision is left. At this stage, the patient usually experiences difficulty moving around in poorly lit places or outdoors at night. Most people end up seeking treatment at this stage when such a significant vision loss has already occurred.

I have had patients walk into my Consultation complaining of poor vision in one eye. Following examination, the patient was found to have Primary Open Angle Glaucoma. The shocking part for such a patient is that whatever visual loss has occurred cannot be reversed. In other words, the vision that has been lost in the affected eye is lost permanently. It is for this reason that those above 40 years of age should have their eyes checked routinely as part of their general health screening.

Dr Gill will elaborate on the eye checks that are done for glaucoma in the next issue of the Ipoh Echo.

For more information, contact Gill Eye Specialist Centre at  05-5455582, email: gilleyecentre@dr.com or visit www.fatimah.com.my.

Eye Health – Glaucoma (Part 2)

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Dr S S Gill, Consultant Ophthalmologist, Hospital Fatimah Ipoh
Dr S S Gill, Consultant Ophthalmologist

In conjunction with World  Glaucoma Week  2012, Ipoh Echo talks to Consultant Eye Surgeon Dr S.S. Gill about this “silent thief of sight”  –  PART 2

Glaucoma as we know is a group of eye diseases that results in permanent blindness in the affected eye(s) that is irreversible. Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness in the world. The disease often goes unnoticed until the loss of vision is significant, hence the nickname “silent thief of sight”.

Who is at risk of glaucoma?

Everyone is at risk for glaucoma and should go for an eye check annually. However, certain groups are at higher risk of developing glaucoma. The following conditions and groups have a higher risk of glaucoma:

  • Aging
  • Family members of glaucoma patients
  • Diabetes Mellitus
  • Short sightedness (Myopia)
  • Long sightedness (Hyperopia)
  • High blood pressure (hypertension)
  • Past or Present use of steroids
  • Migraine
  • Eye injuries
  • Certain ethnic groups – Asians & Africans

People Over 60

Glaucoma is much more common among older people. You are 6 times more likely to get glaucoma if you are over 60 years old and that is why it is important to have your eyes checked as you advance in years.

Family Members with Glaucoma

The most common type of glaucoma is primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). This glaucoma is hereditary. The risk of glaucoma increases by 5 to 9 times if you have a family member who suffers from glaucoma. This hereditary link has been confirmed by two studies, i.e., the Baltimore Eye Study and the Rotterdam Eye Study.

Glaucoma-Rubeosis - eye health - S.S. Gill
Glaucoma-Rubeosis

Diabetes

Several large studies suggest that people with diabetes are more likely to develop glaucoma. If diabetes and glaucoma are treated early, vision can be saved. Otherwise, abnormal vessels in diabetes may form resulting in bleeding in the eye and rubeotic glaucoma (picture on left).

Dr Gill will elaborate more on glaucoma in the next issue of the Ipoh Echo.

For more information, contact Gill Eye Specialist Centre at  05-5455582, email: gilleyecentre@dr.com or visit www.fatimah.com.my.

What is glaucoma?

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Dr S S Gill, Consultant Ophthalmologist, Hospital Fatimah Ipoh
Dr S S Gill, Consultant Ophthalmologist

In conjunction with World Glaucoma Week 2012, Ipoh Echo talks to Consultant Eye Surgeon Dr S.S. Gill about this “silent thief of sight”.

What is glaucoma?

Glaucoma is a group of eye diseases that result in progressive damage of the optic nerve (the “main cable” that carries visual information from the eye to the brain). If glaucoma is not treated, it permanently damages vision in the affected eye(s) and results in blindness.  It is often, but not always, associated with increased pressure of the fluid in the eye (aqueous humour).

Glaucoma has been nicknamed the “silent thief of sight” because the vision loss normally occurs gradually over a long period of time without significant symptoms until you eventually lose significant vision. In other words, it means that one will only notice poor vision when the disease is serious and the damage to the optic nerve is advanced.

Worldwide, glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness after cataracts. Glaucoma affects one in 200 people aged fifty and younger, and one in 10 over the age of eighty. As many as 6 million people are blind in both eyes from glaucoma today. Most of these people were once unaware they had this disease until they lost significant vision in one or both eyes.

One reason why a person may not realise that he or she is losing vision is because the vision loss involves the peripheral part of a person’s vision.  This peripheral vision loss is the reason why it goes unnoticed by the patient until the very late stage when the central vision starts being affected. Rarely, in some patients there may be symptoms of slight eye discomfort, mild headache and haloes around lights.

Any person who is 40 years and above should go for glaucoma screening. More so, if you have a family history of glaucoma and have never been screened for glaucoma yourself, you should go for an eye check as soon as you can.

More on Glaucoma in the next issue.

For more information, contact Gill Eye Specialist Centre at 05-5455582, email: gilleyecentre@dr.com or visit www.fatimah.com.my.

Eye Health – Cataracts

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Dr S S Gill, Consultant Ophthalmologist, Hospital Fatimah Ipoh
Dr S S Gill, Consultant Ophthalmologist

Ipoh Echo’s Eye Health series continues with Consultant Eye Surgeon Dr S.S. Gill talking to us about what needs to be done before you go for cataract surgery.

Arrange time away from work

Patients may need anywhere between a few days to a few weeks off work, depending on the nature of their jobs, before returning to their regular schedule. You should not rush into cataract surgery without sorting this out first as it just adds to your stress.

Arrange for a Driver

It is best to arrange a caregiver to drive you to and from the hospital on the day of your cataract surgery. Make sure your driver is also available on the day after your surgery in order for you to be examined by your doctor on the first postoperative day.

Eye Health - Cataracts - Dr S S GillReview your medications

You will need to give a detailed list of all medications that you are currently taking to the eye surgeon as some of these may need to be adjusted prior to the surgery. Never withhold information on any medication or medical problems that you may be having. Accurate information given to your doctor will help avoid complications and quicken recovery after cataract surgery. Unless instructed by your doctor, you will need to take all of your normal medications on the day of surgery.

If you are on medication to thin the blood (antiplatelet medication) your doctor may require you to stop taking them several days prior to cataract surgery. Generally, cataract surgery is bloodless but in some instances adjustments may still need to be made for some of the blood-thinning medication.

If you are a diabetic with poorly controlled blood glucose levels, your physician will be able to help you sort this out prior to undergoing cataract surgery as you will run a higher risk of complications during the recovery process if this is not attended to.

If you are hypertensive, you will still need to take all your antihypertensive medications on the day of surgery. Do not stop taking these medications unless instructed.

If you are on drugs for treatment of enlarged prostate like Flomax and other similar medications known as alpha-blockers, you will need to highlight this to the doctor prior to eye surgery because these drugs may cause eye problems associated with floppy iris syndrome (IFIS) during cataract surgery.

Eating and drinking

Pay special attention to any special instructions regarding meals prior to surgery. Do not drink any alcoholic beverages for 24 hours prior to your surgery. Follow these instructions closely.

Hygiene

On the day of the Cataract Surgery, your face should be free from makeup, eye-liners, cosmetics or powders of any kind. You should also have a thorough hair-wash and shower on the morning of surgery. Wash your face thoroughly with a mild soap. Proper hygiene will also need to be practised during the healing phase after the surgery.

Dr. Gill will discuss more on what happens during surgery in the next issue of the Ipoh Echo.

For more information, contact Gill Eye Specialist Centre at 05-5455582, email: gilleyecentre@dr.com or visit www.fatimah.com.my.

Eye Health – Cataracts

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Dr S S Gill, Consultant Ophthalmologist

Ipoh Echo’s eye health series continues with consultant eye surgeon Dr S.S. Gill talking to us about multifocal intraocular lens implants during cataract surgery. The Multifocal Intraocular Lens (Multifocal IOL)

An intraocular lens (IOL) is an artificial lens that is implanted in the eye during cataract surgery as highlighted in the previous issue of the Ipoh Echo.  IOLs may be grouped simply as follows:

  • Monofocal IOLs – discussed in issue 131 of the Ipoh Echo
  • Astigmatism-correcting monofocal IOLs (Toric IOLs) – discussed in issue 132 of the Ipoh Echo
  • Multifocal IOLs (Presbyopia correcting) – discussed here
  • Presbyopia & Astigmatism correcting IOLs

In order to understand what a multifocal IOL is, you will need to understand a condition called Presbyopia. The word presbyopia comes from the Greek word presbys meaning “old man” and the Neolatin suffix opia meaning “sightedness”.

Presbyopia

It is the loss of the eye’s ability to change focus to see near objects usually starting around 40 years of age. This loss of power of accommodation to see near objects worsens with age. No one is really spared from this.

The first sign is often the need to hold reading material farther away in order to read a book. You can liken it to a ‘menopause’ of the eye!

Previously, after a person underwent cataract surgery, he or she would have to wear spectacles to read a book unless he is deliberately made short-sighted in which case the distant vision becomes compromised.

Now, with the advancement in IOL technology, we have presbyopia-correcting IOLs or multifocal IOLs. This would generally help a person see both far and near without glasses, therefore providing the comfort of “spectacle-freedom” most of the time or at least close to spectacle freedom for the daily chores.

Multifocal IOL

Multifocal IOLs are high-tech marvels. Most individuals have a good level of satisfaction when implanted with these IOLs. However, even though there is a high level of satisfaction, it is important to note that these IOLs may not produce ABSOLUTELY crisp vision at multiple distances at ALL times and in ALL patients! Even though the majority of people may not need any spectacle correction and enjoy spectacle-freedom, a small number may still require some spectacle help to read fine print. If you cannot accept this fact, then you are not a candidate for a multifocal IOL choice.

Another phenomenon with multifocal IOLs that you may have to be prepared for is the possibility of at least some glare and haloes around light sources at night. This may occur especially immediately after surgery. Nevertheless, these haloes and glare rarely prohibit night driving. They gradually reduce with time and most individuals do not see any haloes or glare by the end of 6 months if not all by the end of 1 year.

Generally, if you do not have any other eye diseases, you will most likely be satisfied with your vision by the end of 6 to 8 months.

As with anything of premium quality, Multifocal IOLs are about 2-3 times more expensive than a standard Monofocal IOL. Still, if you are a suitable candidate, the long-term savings you gain on the regular changes of reading glasses and multifocal spectacles would be well worth your investment.

Dr Gill will discuss more on cataracts & IOLs in the next issue of the Ipoh Echo.

For more information, contact Gill Eye Specialist Centre at 05-5455582, email: gilleyecentre@dr.com or visit www.fatimah.com.my.

Eye Health – Cataracts

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Intraocular Lens (IOL)

An intraocular lens (IOL) is an artificial lens that is implanted in the eye during cataract surgery as highlighted in the previous issue of the Ipoh Echo. IOLs may be grouped simply as follows:

  • Monofocal IOLs – covered in the last issue of the Ipoh Echo
  • Astigmatism-correcting monofocal IOLs (Toric IOLs)
  • Presbyopia correcting IOLs
  • Presbyopia & Astigmatism correcting IOLs

In order to understand what a Toric IOL is, you will need to understand a condition called astigmatism.

What is this astigmatism?

Astigmatism occurs when the transparent part of the front of the eye (cornea) is irregularly shaped. The cornea needs to have a spherical and even shape in order to focus the incoming light rays exactly onto the back of the eye.

Astigmatism – 2 focal points on the back of the eye

If the cornea is irregular (astigmatism), it will distort the vision making it fuzzy because there will be more than one point of focus on the back of the eye (retina). In short, this astigmatism if present, will contribute to blurred vision.

Many people who have short sightedness as well, quite often may also have astigmatism at the same time. In these people, both will need to be corrected in order to have good vision.

What about astigmatism in those who have cataracts? Can we correct or reduce astigmatism in these patients during cataract removal?

Toric Intraocular Lens (Toric IOL)

In recent years, technology has advanced rapidly, so we now have astigmatism correcting IOLs called Toric IOLs. These Toric IOLs help in reducing to some extent, the astigmatism after cataract surgery so that distant vision becomes clear without having to depend too much on spectacles.

The Toric IOL technology was introduced into the IOL market approximately 4 years ago. Before this, should a person have any uncorrected astigmatism, he or she would have to wear spectacles or contact lenses in order to correct the astigmatism after cataract removal. But now, with the introduction of Toric IOLs, it has made correction of astigmatism during cataract surgery so much easier.

In short, should a cataract and astigmatism be present together, then just correcting the cataract alone without reducing the astigmatism will result in the vision not being completely clear. It is best that the astigmatism is corrected at the same time if the astigmatism has been detected before you undergo surgery for cataract. This can be done by implanting an appropriate Toric IOL.

The cost of these Toric IOLs is still relatively affordable for most, being only slightly more expensive than conventional Monofocal IOLs.

Dr. Gill will discuss more on various IOLs in the next issue of the Ipoh Echo.

For more information, contact Gill Eye Specialist Centre at 05-5455582, email: gilleyecentre@dr.com or visit www.fatimah.com.my.

Eye Health – Cataracts

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Dr. S.S. Gill, Consultant Ophthalmologist

Ipoh Echo’s Eye Health series continues with Consultant Eye Surgeon Dr S.S. Gill talking to us about artificial lens implants during cataract surgery.

The Intraocular Lens (IOL)

Dr Harold Ridley stumbled upon the idea of implanting an artificial lens (intraocular lens or IOL) after an intern asked him why he was not replacing the cloudy natural lens (cataract) that he had removed during cataract surgery.

Ridley noticed that RAF pilots of World War II who had pieces of shattered canopy fragments accidentally pierce their eyes in battle had no inflammation. This made him realise that the material was inert and could be used to make the artificial lens (IOL). He then embarked on implanting the first IOL in 1949 using similar material to that of the airplane canopy. The rest is history with implantations of IOLs being routinely performed restoring vision to millions throughout the world especially so since 1977.

Once implanted into the eye, the lens implants (IOL) requires no after-care at all and generally last a lifetime. To the question a patient might ask “What kind of IOL should I choose?” the many varieties of intraocular lenses in the market today can be broadly classified as follows:

  1. Monofocal IOLs,
  2. Astigmatism-correcting monofocal IOLs (Toric IOLs),
  3. Presbyopia correcting IOLs,
  4. Presbyopia & Astigmatism correcting IOLs
Acrysof IQ Lens (pic courtesy of Alcon)

Monofocal Intraocular Lens

These are the most commonly used type of IOL implants worldwide. The monofocal IOL is basically a single focus lens. Unlike the natural lens of the eye, a monofocal intraocular lens cannot alter its shape to bring objects at different distances into focus. Hence, it improves vision for only one distance – either near, intermediate or far vision. This vision is still heaps better than seeing through a cataract!

Most of the time, the eye surgeon generally selects a lens (IOL) that will provide good distance vision, and the person then resorts to wearing reading glasses for the near vision. If you do not mind wearing reading glasses for near, then these IOLs will do fine. A patient who has monofocal IOLs implanted in their eyes may have to wear spectacles at least part of the time, either for near vision or distant vision. Most patients usually just go back to wearing similar multifocal spectacles that they used to wear before the operation. A small number who may be happy with their distant vision may just make spectacles for reading near only (presbyopic glasses).

Monovision Correction

The other thing that may be planned for a patient who is going to undergo cataract surgery is something called monovision correction where the monofocal IOL implanted in one eye corrects for clear distant vision while the IOL implanted for the other eye is corrected for near vision. This is called monovision and the patient slowly gets adjusted to seeing clearly for distance with one eye and reading near clearly with the other eye. This kind of correction requires a little patience on the patient’s part as he or she gets adjusted to the monovision correction. Monovision correction is good when you do not want to wear spectacles and at the same time do not want to spend so much money on IOLs. The cost of these IOLs is relatively affordable for most.

Dr Gill will discuss more on IOL’s in the next issue of the Ipoh Echo.

For more information, contact Gill Eye Specialist Centre at
05-5455582, email: gilleyecentre@dr.com or visit www.fatimah.com.my.

Eye Health – Cataracts

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Dr. S.S. Gill, Consultant Ophthalmologist

Ipoh Echo’s Eye Health Series continues with Consultant Eye Surgeon Dr. S.S. Gill talking to us about Cataracts.

Checking for Cataracts

You will find that going for an eye check to see whether or not you have cataracts may take longer than you think! Firstly, it would entail you reading off a chart placed at a distance to find out how well you see. The eye doctor will then use a bright light (slit-lamp) to check the front part of the eye (anterior segment) in order to look for other eye problems that you may have such as dry eye, eye infections or eye diseases.

A special stain (fluorescein) will be instilled into your eyes and then using a special instrument called a tonometer, the eye pressures will be checked. This is an important step to find out whether you have glaucoma or not since blinding diseases have to be controlled before embarking on a cataract operation.

Remember to take a pair of sunglasses along with you when you go in for an eye examination. In order to determine the extent of cataracts, a full eye examination would require some special eyedrops to be instilled several times into eyes in order for the pupils to dilate. This is because the lens (which becomes opaque to form a cataract) cannot be viewed well until the pupils are dilated.

White cataract

The whole process of dilating your pupils may take anywhere from 30 minutes for a healthy person’s eyes to sometimes up to 90 minutes for some. There is no short-cut to this part of the eye examination.

Once your pupils are dilated, be prepared for some bright lights which will be used in order to examine the eyes. This part of the eye examination may be uncomfortable for some patients who may be more sensitive to glare from the bright lights used to shine into your eyes but rest assured it won’t kill you!

The retina (nerve at the back of the eye) will also be examined and it allows the eye surgeon to predict on the visual outcome following cataract operation.

Following the doctor’s verdict on whether you have a cataract or not, the sunglasses you brought along will now come in handy as you make your way home.

Should you have a cataract, it does not mean you have to go for a cataract operation immediately on the same day, much less on the same week! It is never a life and death situation unless of course you are half-blind. So, do not be hasty. It is important to make sure that medical problems like diabetes mellitus and hypertension be well controlled before embarking on surgery. Always inform the doctor about any underlying medical problems, past surgeries, previous traumas and current medications that you may be taking as some adjustments may need to be done before cataract surgery.  The next step would be to select the appropriate intraocular lens to suit your visual requirements.

Dr. Gill will discuss more on Cataracts in the next issue of the Ipoh Echo.

For more information, contact Gill Eye Specialist Centre at 05-5455582, email: gilleyecentre@dr.com or visit www.fatimah.com.my.